Paper & Cotton

Leaping over bullshit in a single bound

That journey… that journey through middle passage of course is our journey to Mars it’s our journey though space. Because human beings going from a known to an unknown with no landmarks to keep them human, we have to say, how did they do that and remain sane when they got to the other side? This is the Black American journey.
Nikki Giovanni (via femmefluff)
newyorker:

The ballerina Misty Copeland has had a meteoric rise under unique circumstances. Rivka Galchen writes:

"Copeland is considered an unlikely ballerina: she is curvy and she is black, neither of which is a common attribute in the field. But it is her very late beginning and rapid attainment of virtuosity that are arguably without precedent for a female ballerina."

Photograph by Pari Dukovic

newyorker:

The ballerina Misty Copeland has had a meteoric rise under unique circumstances. Rivka Galchen writes:

"Copeland is considered an unlikely ballerina: she is curvy and she is black, neither of which is a common attribute in the field. But it is her very late beginning and rapid attainment of virtuosity that are arguably without precedent for a female ballerina."

Photograph by Pari Dukovic

soulbrotherv2:

Black Girls Code:  This Is What the Next Generation of Engineers Looks Like

by Laura Drell
In college and during her career, Kimberly Bryant often found herself the only black female scientist in the room. The biotech engineer founded the Bay Area non-profit Black Girls CODE in 2011 so that today’s young girls will never find themselves in that position. Bryant realized that it wasn’t a lack of interest in science that led to a dearth of diversity in her field; it was a lack of access. Black Girls CODE’s goal is to drive access and exposure, closing the digital divide.
Black Girls CODE introduces young girls of color to computer programming, mobile app development, robotics and other STEM fields, so the girls can learn how to build the tools they want to see in the world.  [Continue reading article at Mashable.]

soulbrotherv2:


Black Girls Code:  This Is What the Next Generation of Engineers Looks Like

by Laura Drell

In college and during her career, Kimberly Bryant often found herself the only black female scientist in the room. The biotech engineer founded the Bay Area non-profit Black Girls CODE in 2011 so that today’s young girls will never find themselves in that position. Bryant realized that it wasn’t a lack of interest in science that led to a dearth of diversity in her field; it was a lack of access. Black Girls CODE’s goal is to drive access and exposure, closing the digital divide.

Black Girls CODE introduces young girls of color to computer programming, mobile app development, robotics and other STEM fields, so the girls can learn how to build the tools they want to see in the world.  [Continue reading article at Mashable.]