Paper & Cotton

Leaping over bullshit in a single bound

soulrevision:

[For more on social justice, follow me on Instagram: soulrevision]

1st Photo

Top: Black inmates on the chain gang in Atlanta in 1895

Bottom: Black inmates at Angola in 2014 

2nd Photo

Top: Black “child convicts” at Angola in 1903 

Bottom: Black inmates at Angola in 2014

3rd Photo

Top: Black women prisoners at Angola in the 1920’s/1930’s

Bottom: Black male inmates at Angola in 2014

Absolutely NOTHING has changed except the years. These photos are not only disturbing to look at, they prove that prison is a form of modern day slavery and that Nina Simone was correct when she said, “slavery has never been abolished from America’s way of thinking”. Welcome to the New Jim Crow.

Look, without our stories, without the true nature and reality of who we are as People of Color, nothing about fanboy or fangirl culture would make sense. What I mean by that is: if it wasn’t for race, X-Men doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the history of breeding human beings in the New World through chattel slavery, Dune doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the history of colonialism and imperialism, Star Wars doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the extermination of so many Indigenous First Nations, most of what we call science fiction’s contact stories doesn’t make sense. Without us as the secret sauce, none of this works, and it is about time that we understood that we are the Force that holds the Star Wars universe together. We’re the Prime Directive that makes Star Trek possible, yeah. In the Green Lantern Corps, we are the oath. We are all of these things—erased, and yet without us—we are essential.
Junot Díaz, “The Junot Díaz Episode" (18 November 2013) on Fan Bros, a podcast “for geek culture via people of colors” (via kynodontas)
The legacy of anti-Black racism is that Black struggle gets deemed the property of all other social justice struggles. The symbols and tactics of Black struggle are deemed the common property of all. Black people are required to show solidarity with other people of color, without other people of color owing solidarity to Black communities. Black oppression is always analogized to other forms of oppression in a manner that disappears Black oppression itself. It is presumed we already know everything about Black oppression, so we can just use it as an empty signifier to explain other oppressions.

Andrea Smith, as quoted by @prisonculture on twitter. (via so-treu)

Damn. TELL IT.

Black oppression is always analogized to other forms of oppression in a manner that disappears Black oppression itself.

If I had a dollar for every. fucking. time.someone compared being black to being gay, or disabled, or…..anything really. 

(via dearaudre)

THIS!!!!!!!

(via jcoleknowsbest)